No rules. Jus' write.

As our Jewish friends around the nation celebrate Shavuot, I got to thinking about the Lord’s Prayer. It’s possibly the most well-known and recited set of verses in the bible and can be found in Matthew 6:9-13.

Unfortunately, it may also be the least understood set of verses as it’s offered up so often by memory. Rarely is it taught — especially in more formalized gatherings of the body of Christ — that the Lord’s Prayer is but a model demonstrating how we are to pray to our Heavenly Father.

“Our Father, who art in heaven” teaches us who to address in prayer. “Hallowed be thy name” calls us to respect and to humility, and is a reminder that we are to worship and revere God as he is holy.

“Thy kingdom come; thy will be done, on earth as in heaven” reminds us to pray in alignment with Gods will and not jus’ our own selfish desires. “Give us this day our daily bread” encourages us to ask God to meet our daily needs and serves to remind us theat worry is an unnecessary action.

“And forgive us our trespasses, as we forgive those who trespass against us” reminds us to confess our wrongs to God and to also forgive others as we’ve been forgiven by God. And in conclusion to the Lord’s Prayer, “And lead us not into temptation; but deliver us from evil” is a plea for help in achieving victory over our shortcomings, moral failures and against the evil that resides in this world.

Often this prayer is ended with an “Amen, which simply means meaning ‘so be it.’ Also, and though it is not believed to be a part of original biblical text, there are some denominations which add a short praise line known as a doxology, “For thine is the kingdom, the power, and the glory, for ever and ever. Amen.”

Advertisements

Let me know what you think...

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Tag Cloud

%d bloggers like this: