‘Best Practices’ and ‘Collaboration’

A confidential Department of Justice (DOJ) memo, released February 5, 2013, says the federal government can kill an American citizen if it’s believed they are a “senior operational leaders” of al-Qaida or “an associated force” — even if there is no intelligence indicating they are engaged in an active plot to attack the U.S. The 16-page memo provides new details about the legal reasoning behind strikes against al-Qaida suspects abroad, including those aimed at American citizens including Anwar al-Awlaki and Samir Khan, who were both U.S. citizens and never indicted or charged with any crimes.

The memo, filled with words like ‘best practices,’ and collaboration,’ also eliminates the barriers of “geographic limitations,” and asserts the ability to “follow” the target to “a new nation.” That leaves the entire world as the battlefield, including the United States.

Couple this to the fact that the Department of Homeland Security laid the foundation on April 7, 2009 on whom it considers a terrorist. These so-called “terrorists’ include anyone who is concerned about illegal immigration, abortion, increasing federal power, restrictions on firearms and veterans.

Even more nefarious is the ‘Strong Cities Network,’ which was introduced by the DOJ on September 28, 2015 in a press release, that also uses ‘best practices,’ and collaboration,’ the federal government has joined with a U.N. supported international law enforcement coalition for the claimed purpose of “strengthen[ing] community resilience against violent extremism.” Essentially, the ‘Strong Cities Network’ has the potential to grow into something complete with laws that are both foreign and adverse to the U.S. Constitution.

Now add to the mix the July 1, 2016 Executive Order, titled, “Executive Order — United States Policy on Pre- and Post-Strike Measures to Address Civilian Casualties in U.S. Operations Involving the Use of Force.” And while the title seems innocuous, the language of the order is broad and vague, though it too uses ‘best practices,’ and collaboration,’ freely.

But what is most striking is that this order makes no distinction between military operations “against terrorist targets outside areas of active hostilities,” and U.S. soil. The circle fully closes once the memo of February 2013 is taken into consideration; leading to the fact that all one has to do to wind-up dead is threaten “the Nation’s inherent right of self-defense…”

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About Tom Darby

French-born, American-raised, U.S. citizen, husband, father, friend, veteran, and writer.
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One Response to ‘Best Practices’ and ‘Collaboration’

  1. Kay Casti says:

    Very good!

    Liked by 1 person

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